Direkt zum Seiteninhalt

Shelley: Der Maskenzug der Anarchie

Werkstatt / Reihen

DER ANLASS


Nach dem Sieg über Napoleon 1815 litt England landesweit unter Arbeitslosigkeit und Hungersnot. Soziale Kundgebungen wurden mit Waffengewalt brutal unterdrückt. Am 16. August 1819 kam es auf dem heutigen St. Peter’s Field in Manchester zu einem Kavallerieangriff, bei dem Hunderte von Demonstranten niedergeritten wurden; mindestens 20 Todesopfer (darunter Frauen und Kinder) und zahlreiche schwer Verwundete waren zu beklagen. Dieses Gefecht von Peterloo ist als Massaker von Manchester in die Geschichtsbücher eingegangen. Die Nachricht verbreitete sich wie ein Lauffeuer durch Europa. Shelley erfuhr davon in Italien und reagierte noch im gleichen Jahr mit folgender Masque, die allerdings erst 1832 (posthum) veröffentlicht wurde.


DIE MITTEL


Ein politischer Appell als Maskenzug. Allegorische Figuren treten auf: Tugenden und Laster, Ideale und Sehnsüchte, insbesondere die ANARCHIE und als Gegenbild die FREIHEIT. Zwei dieser Figuren –– eine seltsame Mänade namens HOFFNUNG (die der VERZWEIFLUNG zum Verwechseln ähnlich sieht) und MUTTER ERDE –– treten in den Vordergrund und wenden sich an Englands Arbeiter und über sie ans Publikum, um uns aufzurütteln wie Löwen aus dem Schlummer.


Shelley nutzt dabei einen kopfbetonten Vierzeiler, der aus zwei Reimpaaren gebildet wird (a–a, b–b), und weitet ihn gelegentlich zum Fünfzeiler (a–a, b–b–b). Ebenso wechselt er gelegentlich das trochäische Metrum und geht fast unmerklich ins jambische über. Und ganz am Anfang steht sogar ein Anapäst: As I lay asleep in Italy, eingesetzt, um aus einem lockeren Parlando in den trochäischen Grundton hineinzugleiten.


Der deutsche Text imitiert solche metrischen Besonderheiten, erlaubt sich aber hier und da kleine Abweichungen, wenn sie den deutschen Sprechgewohnheiten besser entsprechen.

Die Raumnot einer metrischen Übersetzung aus dem Englischen ins Deutsche führt nicht selten zu freier, komplex zusammenfassender Paraphrasierung sowie zu grammatischer Anpassung ans deutsche Idiom. So wurde beispielsweise das englische King zu Majestät, weil Anarchy im Englischen männlich, Anarchie aber weiblich aufgefaßt wird. Das kursiv gesetzte Brecht der Schlußstrophe ist eine Ovation an Bertolt Brecht, der sich des Maskenzugs von Shelley während seiner Realismus-Debatte (z.B. mit Johannes R. Becher) 1938 eindrucksvoll angenommen hat.

Günter Plessow, Mai 2014


The Masque (Mask) of Anarchy
Written on the Occasion of the Massacre of Manchester (1819)



1


As I lay asleep in Italy
There came a voice from over the Sea,
And with great power it forth led me
To walk in the visions of Poesy.


2


I met Murder on the way––
He had a mask like Castlereagh––
Very smooth he looked, yet grim;
Seven blood-hounds followed him:


3


All were fat; and well they might
Be in admirable plight,
For one by one, and two by two,
He tossed them human hearts to chew
Which from his wide cloak he drew.


4


Next came Fraud, and he had on,
Like Eldon, an ermined gown;
His big tears, for he wept well,
Turned to mill-stones as they fell.


5


And the little children, who
Round his feet played to and fro,
Thinking every tear a gem,
Had their brains knocked out by them.


6


Clothed with the Bible, as with light,
And the shadows of the night,
Like Sidmouth, next, Hypocrisy
On a crocodile rode by.


7


And many more Destructions played
In this ghastly masquerade,
All disguised, even to the eyes,
Like Bishops, lawyers, peers, or spies.


8


Last came Anarchy: he rode
On a white horse, splashed with blood;
He was pale even to the lips,
Like Death in the Apocalypse.


9


And he wore a kingly crown;
And in his grasp a sceptre shone;
On his brow this mark I saw––
'I AM GOD, AND KING, AND LAW!'


10


With a pace stately and fast,
Over English land he passed,
Trampling to a mire of blood
The adoring multitude.


11


And a mighty troop around,
With their trampling shook the ground,
Waving each a bloody sword,
For the service of their Lord.


12


And with glorious triumph, they
Rode through England proud and gay,
Drunk as with intoxication
Of the wine of desolation.


13


O'er fields and towns, from sea to sea,
Passed the Pageant swift and free,
Tearing up, and trampling down;
Till they came to London town.


14


And each dweller, panic-stricken,
Felt his heart with terror sicken
Hearing the tempestuous cry
Of the triumph of Anarchy.


15


For with pomp to meet him came,
Clothed in arms like blood and flame,
The hired murderers, who did sing
‘Thou art God, and Law, and King.


16


‘We have waited, weak and lone
For thy coming, Mighty One!
Our purses are empty, our swords are cold,
Give us glory, and blood, and gold.’


17


Lawyers and priests, a motley crowd,
To the earth their pale brows bowed;
Like a bad prayer not over loud,
Whispering––‘Thou art Law and God.’––


18


Then all cried with one accord,
`Thou art King, and God, and Lord;
Anarchy, to thee we bow,
Be thy name made holy now!'


19


And Anarchy, the Skeleton,
Bowed and grinned to every one,
As well as if his education
Had cost ten millions to the nation.


20


For he knew the Palaces
Of our Kings were rightly his;
His the sceptre, crown, and globe,
And the gold-inwoven robe.


21


So he sent his slaves before
To seize upon the Bank and Tower,
And was proceeding with intent
To meet his pensioned Parliament


22


When one fled past, a maniac maid,
And her name was Hope, she said:
But she looked more like Despair,
And she cried out in the air:


23


‘My father Time is weak and gray
With waiting for a better day;
See how idiot-like he stands,
Fumbling with his palsied hands!


24


`He has had child after child,
And the dust of death is piled
Over every one but me––
Misery, oh, Misery!'


25


Then she lay down in the street,
Right before the horses' feet,
Expecting, with a patient eye,
Murder, Fraud, and Anarchy.


26


When between her and her foes
A mist, a light, an image rose,
Small at first, and weak, and frail
Like the vapour of a vale:


27


Till as clouds grow on the blast,
Like tower-crowned giants striding fast,
And glare with lightnings as they fly,
And speak in thunder to the sky,


28


It grew––a Shape arrayed in mail
Brighter than the viper's scale,
And upborne on wings whose grain
Was as the light of sunny rain.


29


On its helm, seen far away,
A planet, like the Morning's, lay;
And those plumes its light rained through
Like a shower of crimson dew.


30


With step as soft as wind it passed
O'er the heads of men––so fast
That they knew the presence there,
And looked,––but all was empty air.


31


As flowers beneath May's footstep waken,
As stars from Night's loose hair are shaken,
As waves arise when loud winds call,
Thoughts sprung where'er that step did fall.


32


And the prostrate multitude
Looked––and ankle-deep in blood,
Hope, that maiden most serene,
Was walking with a quiet mien:


33


And Anarchy, the ghastly birth,
Lay dead earth upon the earth;
The Horse of Death tameless as wind
Fled, and with his hoofs did grind
To dust the murderers thronged behind.


34


A rushing light of clouds and splendour,
A sense awakening and yet tender
Was heard and felt––and at its close
These words of joy and fear arose


35


As if their own indignant Earth
Which gave the sons of England birth
Had felt their blood upon her brow,
And shuddering with a mother's throe


36


Had turnèd every drop of blood
By which her face had been bedewed
To an accent unwithstood,--
As if her heart had cried aloud:


37


‘Men of England, heirs of Glory,
Heroes of unwritten story,
Nurslings of one mighty Mother,
Hopes of her, and one another;


38


‘Rise like Lions after slumber
In unvanquishable number,
Shake your chains to earth like dew
Which in sleep had fallen on you––
Ye are many––they are few.


39


‘What is Freedom?––ye can tell
That which slavery is, too well––
For its very name has grown
To an echo of your own.


40


‘'Tis to work and have such pay
As just keeps life from day to day
In your limbs, as in a cell
For the tyrants' use to dwell,


41


‘So that ye for them are made
Loom, and plough, and sword, and spade,
With or without your own will bent
To their defence and nourishment.


42


‘'Tis to see your children weak
With their mothers pine and peak,
When the winter winds are bleak,––
They are dying whilst I speak.


43


‘'Tis to hunger for such diet
As the rich man in his riot
Casts to the fat dogs that lie
Surfeiting beneath his eye;


44


‘'Tis to let the Ghost of Gold
Take from Toil a thousandfold
More than e'er its substance could
In the tyrannies of old.


45


‘Paper coin––that forgery
Of the title-deeds, which ye
Hold to something of the worth
Of the inheritance of Earth.


46


‘'Tis to be a slave in soul
And to hold no strong control
Over your own wills, but be
All that others make of ye.


47


‘And at length when ye complain
With a murmur weak and vain
'Tis to see the Tyrant's crew
Ride over your wives and you--
Blood is on the grass like dew.


48


‘Then it is to feel revenge
Fiercely thirsting to exchange
Blood for blood -- and wrong for wrong --
Do not thus when ye are strong.


49


‘Birds find rest, in narrow nest
When weary of their wingèd quest;
Beasts find fare, in woody lair
When storm and snow are in the air,


50


‘Asses, swine, have litter spread
And with fitting food are fed;
All things have a home but one––
Thou, Oh, Englishman, hast none!


51


‘This is Slavery––savage men,
Or wild beasts within a den
Would endure not as ye do––
But such ills they never knew.


52


‘What art thou Freedom? O! could slaves
Answer from their living graves
This demand––tyrants would flee
Like a dream's dim imagery:


53


‘Thou art not, as impostors say,
A shadow soon to pass away,
A superstition, and a name
Echoing from the cave of Fame.


54


‘For the labourer thou art bread,
And a comely table spread
From his daily labour come
In a neat and happy home.


55


‘Thou art clothes, and fire, and food
For the trampled multitude––
No––in countries that are free
Such starvation cannot be
As in England now we see.


56


‘To the rich thou art a check,
When his foot is on the neck
Of his victim, thou dost make
That he treads upon a snake.


57


‘Thou art Justice––ne'er for gold
May thy righteous laws be sold
As laws are in England––thou
Shield'st alike the high and low.


58


‘Thou art Wisdom––Freemen never
Dream that God will damn for ever
All who think those things untrue
Of which Priests make such ado.


59


‘Thou art Peace––never by thee
Would blood and treasure wasted be
As tyrants wasted them, when all
Leagued to quench thy flame in Gaul.


60


‘What if English toil and blood
Was poured forth, even as a flood?
It availed, Oh, Liberty,
To dim, but not extinguish thee.


61


‘Thou art Love––the rich have kissed
Thy feet, and like him following Christ,
Give their substance to the free
And through the rough world follow thee,


62


‘Or turn their wealth to arms, and make
War for thy belovèd sake
On wealth, and war, and fraud--whence they
Drew the power which is their prey.


63


‘Science, Poetry, and Thought
Are thy lamps; they make the lot
Of the dwellers in a cot
So serene, they curse it not.


64


‘Spirit, Patience, Gentleness,
All that can adorn and bless
Art thou -- let deeds, not words, express
Thine exceeding loveliness.


65


‘Let a great Assembly be
Of the fearless and the free
On some spot of English ground
Where the plains stretch wide around.


66


‘Let the blue sky overhead,
The green earth on which ye tread,
All that must eternal be
Witness the solemnity.


67


‘From the corners uttermost
Of the bonds of English coast;
From every hut, village, and town
Where those who live and suffer moan
For others' misery or their own.


68


‘From the workhouse and the prison
Where pale as corpses newly risen,
Women, children, young and old
Groan for pain, and weep for cold––


69


‘From the haunts of daily life
Where is waged the daily strife
With common wants and common cares
Which sows the human heart with tares––


70


‘Lastly from the palaces
Where the murmur of distress
Echoes, like the distant sound
Of a wind alive around


71


‘Those prison halls of wealth and fashion,
Where some few feel such compassion
For those who groan, and toil, and wail
As must make their brethren pale––


72


‘Ye who suffer woes untold,
Or to feel, or to behold
Your lost country bought and sold
With a price of blood and gold––


73


‘Let a vast assembly be,
And with great solemnity
Declare with measured words that ye
Are, as God has made ye, free––


74


‘Be your strong and simple words
Keen to wound as sharpened swords,
And wide as targes let them be,
With their shade to cover ye.


75


‘Let the tyrants pour around
With a quick and startling sound,
Like the loosening of a sea,
Troops of armed emblazonry.


76


‘Let the charged artillery drive
Till the dead air seems alive
With the clash of clanging wheels,
And the tramp of horses' heels.


77


‘Let the fixèd bayonet
Gleam with sharp desire to wet
Its bright point in English blood
Looking keen as one for food.


78


‘Let the horsemen's scimitars
Wheel and flash, like sphereless stars
Thirsting to eclipse their burning
In a sea of death and mourning.


79


‘Stand ye calm and resolute,
Like a forest close and mute,
With folded arms and looks which are
Weapons of unvanquished war,


80


‘And let Panic, who outspeeds
The career of armèd steeds
Pass, a disregarded shade
Through your phalanx undismayed.


81


‘Let the laws of your own land,
Good or ill, between ye stand
Hand to hand, and foot to foot,
Arbiters of the dispute,


82


‘The old laws of England––they
Whose reverend heads with age are gray,
Children of a wiser day;
And whose solemn voice must be
Thine own echo––Liberty!


83


‘On those who first should violate
Such sacred heralds in their state
Rest the blood that must ensue,
And it will not rest on you.


84


‘And if then the tyrants dare
Let them ride among you there,
Slash, and stab, and maim, and hew,––
What they like, that let them do.


85


‘With folded arms and steady eyes,
And little fear, and less surprise,
Look upon them as they slay
Till their rage has died away.


86


‘Then they will return with shame
To the place from which they came,
And the blood thus shed will speak
In hot blushes on their cheek.


87


‘Every woman in the land
Will point at them as they stand––
They will hardly dare to greet
Their acquaintance in the street.


88


‘And the bold, true warriors
Who have hugged Danger in wars
Will turn to those who would be free,
Ashamed of such base company.


89


‘And that slaughter to the Nation
Shall steam up like inspiration,
Eloquent, oracular;
A volcano heard afar.


90


‘And these words shall then become
Like Oppression's thundered doom
Ringing through each heart and brain,
Heard again––again––again––


91


‘Rise like Lions after slumber
In unvanquishable number––
Shake your chains to earth like dew
Which in sleep ha’d fallen on you––
Ye are many––they are few.’

Der Maskenzug der Anarchie
Geschrieben anlässlich des Massakers von Manchester 1819


1


Als ich lag und schlief am Mittelmeer
,
da riefs mich auf––von England her,
wies mir den Weg und dem Gedicht;
eröffnete mir weite Sicht.


2


Unterwegs traf ich den MORD––
sah aus wie Castlereagh¹––aufs Wort––
aalglatt und zugleich durchtrieben,
hinter ihm Bluthunde: sieben,


3


alle fett und fabelhaft
getrimmt; er hatte es geschafft,
daß jeder auf die Beute flog
und Kraft aus Menschenherzen sog,
die er aus seinem Mantel zog.


4


Der BETRUG–– im Hermelin
wie Eldon²––kam als nächster, schien
zu weinen: Tränen, die zu Steinen
wurden, wenn sie fielen. Kleinen


5


Kindern, die zu seinen Füßen
spielten, wo sie fühlen müssen,
was so eine Träne sei,
schlugen sie das Hirn entzwei.


6


Ausgestattet mit dem Licht
der Bibel––glich sie Sidmouth³ nicht?––
ritt als nächste HEUCHELEI
auf dem Krokodil vorbei.


7


All das, was uns demontiert,
wurde gräßlich vorgeführt,
den Leib vermummt, den Blick verstellt
wie Bischof, Richter, Mann von Welt.


8


Ganz am Schluß ritt ANARCHIE:
blutbespritzt ihr Schimmel, sie
totenblaß, die Lippen fahl:
apokalyptisches Fanal.


9


Trug eines Königs Krone, griff
ein Zepter, und es stand die Schrift
auf ihrer Stirne recht und schlecht––
'BIN GOTT UND MAJETÄT UND RECHT!'


10


Ritt in einem raschen Trab
England auf und England ab
und zermalmt’ die Menge, die
betete und nach ihr schrie.


11


Mächtig, diese Menge, und
sie erschütterte den Grund,
jeder schwenkt sein Schwert so gern
im Dienst der Herrin (und des Herrn).


12


Im Triumph durchritten sie
England, übermütig wie
Trunkene vom Rausch des Weins
völligen Verwüstetseins.


13


Von See zu See durch Land und Au
spielten sie ihr Spiel zur Schau,
sie zerrissen und zertraten,
London schien im Blut zu waten.


14


Jeden Bürger traf der Schreck,
ja, der Herzschlag blieb ihm weg,
hörte er die Agonie
im Triumph der ANARCHIE
.


15


Denn gedungene Mörder kamen
mit Aplomb; in IHREM Namen
sangen sie von früh bis spät:
‘Du bist GOTT, RECHT, MAJESTÄT.


16


Deiner haben wir geharrt,
Macht––nun bist du Gegenwart!
Kalt die Schwerter, knapp der Sold,
gib uns Ruhm und Blut und Gold.’


17


Richter, Priester samt der Herde
beugten ihre Stirn zur Erde,
beteten so bös wie flott,
flehten: ‘Du bist Recht und Gott.’


18


Stimmten ein in den Akkord:
‘Du bist
GOTT und unser LORD,
ANARCHIE, wir dienen dir,
heilig sei dein Name hier!’


19


Und ANARCHIE, dieses Skelett,
grüßte jeden so, als hätt
der Staat Millionen ausgegeben,
seine Bildung anzuheben.


20


Wußte ja, in Wahrheit war
des Königs Schloß samt Inventar,
Zepter, Krone nun das IHRE,
jede goldene Bordüre.


21


Schickte ihre Sklaven vor,
nahm Bank und Tower und verlor
ihr pensioniertes Parlament
nicht aus dem Augen––doch da rennt


22


eine Mänade rasch vorbei,
behauptet, daß sie HOFFNUNG sei
(sah eher wie VERZWEIFLUNG aus)
und rief, es brach aus ihr heraus:


23


‘Mein Vater ZEIT ist altersschwach,
erwartet bessere Tage, ach!
Er steht und fummelt––ist es nicht
idiotisch?––hat ja längst die Gicht!


24


Kind auf Kind hat er gezeugt,
und der Staub des Todes beugt
doch ein jedes außer mir––
Elend über Elend hier!’


25


Ließ sich nieder auf die Erde
vor die Hufe ihrer Pferde,
harrte––wartete auf sie:
MORD, BETRUG und ANARCHIE––


26


da erhob sich etwas schier
Nebelhaftes zwischen ihr
und den Widersachern: klein,
dunstig, schwach, ein lichter Schein,


27


bis, so wie sich Wolken türmen,
die wie Riesen auf den Stürmen
reiten, fliegen, sich erfrechen,
mit dem Himmel selbst zu sprechen,


28


etwas wuchs––eine GESTALT,
etwas wie Schuppen gab ihr Halt,
auf Schwingen trug es sie empor,
wie Sonnenregen kam mirs vor;


29


auf ihrem Helm, weither zu sehn,
ein Wanderstern, wie Morgen schön;
und rosig rann durch ihr Gefieder
lauter lichter Tau hernieder.


30


Mit einem Schritt so weich wie Wind
war sie auch schon vorbei, geschwind;
jeder wußte, sie war da––
jeder schaute, keiner sah.


31


Wie wenn im Mai das Blühn erwacht,
wie Sternenstaub vom Haar der Nacht,
wie Wellen quelln, wenn Winde wehn,
waren Gedanken im Entstehn.


32


Die Menge warf sich nieder, gaffte
––HOFFNUNG, jenes zauberhafte
Mädchen, knöcheltief im Blut
watend, wahrte guten Mut:


33


Und
ANARCHIE, dies Stirb statt Werde,
legte Erde nun zu Erde;
TODES Pferd, das Ungetüm,
ging durch, die Mörder hinter ihm
zu Staub getreten ungestüm.


34


Doch durch die Wolken brach ein Licht,
erweckte, doch erschreckte nicht,
es sprach, man hörte, spürte es,
wars froh, zu Worten führte es


35


der MUTTER ERDE
an die Söhne
Englands, indignierte Töne,
so als spüre sie ihr Blut
auf ihrer Stirne, und die Wut


36


verwandle jeden Tropfen in
Empörung––welch ein Widersinn,
welch ein Motiv zum Widerstand––
ihr Herz schrie auf und rief ins Land:


37


‘Männer Englands, euer Ruhm,
mehr noch: euer Heldentum:
aufgeschrieben ists noch nicht––
ihr seid Englands Zuversicht.


38


Löwen, schlummert ihr denn noch?
Unbesiegbar seid ihr doch.
Brecht ihr eure Ketten nicht,
dann verfällt die Chance schlicht––
Ihr––ihr zählt––sie zählen nicht.


39


Was ist FREIHEIT?––Sklaverei
kennt ihr nur zu gut, als sei
dieser Name Widerklang
des euren euer Leben lang.


40


Zu arbeiten fürs täglich Brot?
––der Lohn ernährt nur eure Not.
Im Kerker eingesperrt zu leben?
den Tyrannen Brot zu geben,


41


so daß ihr ihr Werkzeug seid,
Pflug und Schwert, und stets bereit,
euch zu ihren Zweck zu beugen,
Wohl und Waffen zu erzeugen?


42


Zuzusehn, wie eure Kinder
kränkeln, eure Frauen nicht minder,
die, indes wir diskutieren,
darben, schmachten und erfrieren?


43


Zu schmachten nach dem kargen Schmaus,
den der Herr in Saus und Braus
den fetten Hunden gönnt––sie lungern
nur herum––und läßt euch hungern?


44


Zu dulden, daß das GOLD zu Geld
wird, eurer Mühsal Wert verfällt:
ein Tausendstel von der Substanz
der Tyrannei des reichen Manns


45


seit alters?––Münzen aus Papier?
Falschgeld, Fälschung, welcher ihr
aufsitzt––haltet ihrs für Werte
aus der Erbschaft dieser
ERDE?


46


Es ist eure Sklavenrolle
ohne eigene Kontrolle
über euern eigenen Willen––
das, was andere wolln, erfüllen?


47


Und schließlich, wenn ihr Klage führt
––vergebens, wie ihr selber spürt––
mit anzusehn, was diese Brut
mit euch und euern Weibern tut––
der Tau im Gras ist rot, ist Blut––


48


Rache üben? Blinde Wut?
Aug um Auge, Blut um Blut?
Unrecht teilen? Arg um Arg?––
Tut es nicht! Seid ihr nicht stark?


49


Vögel retten sich ins Nest,
um auszuruhn vom steifen West,
wilde Tiere in den Wald,
wenns Winter wird und bitter kalt,


50


jedes Haustier hat durchaus
Spreu und Futter, ein Zuhaus:
alle Wesen bis auf eines––
du nur, Engländer, hast keines!


51


Das ist SKLAVEREI––die Wilden
würden mancherlei Unbilden
dulden, doch nicht die, die ihr
leidet––niemals, glaubt es mir.


52


Was bist du, FREIHEIT?––Antwort gäben
Sklaven, die in Gräbern leben,
und es flüchteten Tyrannen
wie ein trister Traum von dannen:


53


Du bist nicht ein Schatte, wie
die Zöllner sagen, warst auch nie
ein Aberglaube, der nur so
dahergesagt war irgendwo.


54


Du bist der gedeckte Tisch
für den, der alle Tage frisch
zur Arbeit geht und müd zurück
ins Haus tritt, und es glänzt vor Glück.


55


Du bist Feuerbrand und Brot
der Getretenen––Hungernot
wie in England darf nicht sein,
nicht in freien Ländern––nein!
Kleidest alle Klassen ein,


56


prüfst  den Reichen, wirst ihn packen;
setzt den Fuß er in den Nacken
seines Opfers, wirkst du mit,
daß er eine Schlange tritt.


57


Du bist die GERECHTIGKEIT––
mögen Rechte nie wie heut
verhökert werden hierzulande––
schütz uns vor den Herrn von Stande!


58


Du bist WEISHEIT––Freie wissen,
ewige Verdammnis müssen
sie nicht mehr für Wahrheit halten,
wie die Priester sie verwalten.


59


Du bist FRIEDEN––würdest nie
Blut und Gut verwüsten wie
Tyrannen, die zusammenrücken,
deine Flamme zu ersticken.


60


Was, wenn England all sein Blut
vergösse? FREIHEIT––eine Flut
verdunkelte vielleicht dein Licht,
doch es erlösche sicher nicht.


61


Du bis LIEBE––Reiche küssen
dir die Füße (weil sie müssen);
und als ob sie Christen seien,
unterstützen sie die Freien


62


oder rüsten auf und machen
Krieg, um deinetwillen fachen
sie ihn an, doch gehts ums Geld,
das ihnen in die Hände fällt.


63


WISSENSCHAFT und POESIE
leuchten dir und denen, die
gern in einer Kate leben
und nach anderm Gut nicht streben.


64


Du bist GEIST, GEDULD und ADEL,
du bist ohne Fehl und Tadel,
––darum laß statt Worten Taten
sprechen und zum Rechten raten.


65


Laß eine Versammlung sein,
lade alle dazu ein:
furchtlos all die fast Befreiten
irgendwo in Englands Weiten.


66


Laßt das Blau, zu dem ihr betet,
und das Grün, auf das ihr tretet,
alles sein, das Ewigkeit
bezeugt und wahre Würde leiht.


67


Von den Rändern, von den Küsten
Englands (die verbinden müßten),
aus den Hütten, wo, soweit
Menschen wohnen, nur das Leid
lebt und um Erbarmen schreit…


68


aus Fabriken, wo die bleichen
gleichsam lebend toten Leichen:
Weiber, Kinder, alt wie jung,
stöhnen––Hunger, Auszehrung––


69


aus dem Alltag, aus dem Zwist,
der uns heimsucht––Mangel ist
allgemein, das Menschenherz
kennt nur Sorge noch und Schmerz––


70


schließlich auch aus den Palästen,
die von Unheil und Gebresten
widerklingen, wo es summt,
wie so ein Wind, der nicht verstummt;


71


aus modernen Wohlstandswelten,
wo nur wenige (und selten)
Mitleid kennen, Unbehagen
daran, was die Brüder tragen––


72


Ihr, ihr alle, die ihrs spürt
oder wißt, wozu es führt,
wenn euer verlornes Land
zum Verkauf steht, Unverstand!––


73


Laßt eine Versammlung sein,
die verbindlich, allgemein,
maßvoll, feierlich erklärt,
daß ihr frei seid––gott-gewährt––


74


Wählt die Worte schlicht und stark,
scharf geschliffen und autark,
gut gezielt und wie ein Schild,
in dessen Schatten ihr euch hüllt.


75


Die Tyrannen, aufgescheucht,
laßt sie!––wenn sie euch vielleicht
auch mit Truppen überschwemmen
werden, schwerlich einzudämmen––


76


Laßt sie ihr Geschütz auffahren!
––Räderkreischen, Reiterscharen
sind ja rasch ins Feld geführt,
bis der Äther selbst vibriert––


77


Laßt sie!––Bajonette blitzen
auf, um Englands Haut zu ritzen
und, wie wenn sie durstig wären,
sich von Englands Blut zu nähren––


78


Laßt sie ihre krummen Säbel
kreisen, finstern Sternennebel
steigen lassen! durch sein Funkeln
Tod und Trauer zu umdunkeln––


79


Steht gelassen, wortlos, stumm
wie ein Wald und blickt euch um
mit verschränkten Armen, dann
seid ihr unbesiegbar––wann?


80


Laßt die Panik! Die vergeht
ebenso, wie sie entsteht,
wie ein Schatten, wenn ihr fragt;
schließt die Reihen unverzagt!


81


Laßt Gesetze, laßt das Recht
eures Landes recht und schlecht
eure Streitigkeiten schlichten!
Überlaßt es den Gerichten,


82


unparteiisch, wie sie sind
von Alters her, ein graues Kind
weiseren Tages, ein Echo,
wahr und würdevoll; sei’s froh,
Freiheit, sprich auch du nur so!


83


Auf denen, die das Recht verletzen,
––das, auf welches jene setzen––
lastet schwere Blutschuld nun,
doch auf euch wird keine ruhn.


84


Die Tyrannen––wenn sie wagen,
euch zu treffen und zu schlagen,
wenn es das ist, was sie wissen––
laßt sie machen, was sie müssen.


85


Schaut ihnen ruhig ins Gesicht,
verschränkt die Arme, laßt euch nicht
provozieren, nein: faßt Mut,
dann verstirbt all ihre Wut.


86


Dann zieht jeder sich zurück,
wo er herkam, Scham im Blick,
rotgefleckte Wangen sprechen
von der Blutschuld, vom Verbrechen.


87


Jede Frau wird auf sie zeigen,
wenn sie dastehn, wenn sie schweigen––
und sie werden schwerlich wagen
mehr als Guten Tag zu sagen.


88


Und die Krieger, die in Kriegen
die GEFAHR umarmten, siegen,
wandeln sich, sind fortan frei,
auch von niedrer Kumpanei.


89


Jenes Völkerschlachten wird
Geist, Verheißung, unbeirrt,
eloquent, orakelhaft,
ferne eruptive Kraft.


90


Diese Worte drohen dann
donnernde Verdammnis an,
drücken Unterdrücker nieder
immer wíeder––wieder––wieder––


91


Löwen! Schlummert immer noch?
Unbesiegbar seid ihr doch.
Brecht ihr eure Ketten nicht,
dann verfällt die Chance schlicht––
Ihr––ihr zählt––sie zählen nicht.’

¹  [Lord] Castlereagh: Robert Stewart, Marquess of Londonderry und Viscount Castlereagh (1769–1822), irisch-britischer Politiker, Leiter der Toryfraktion im House of Commons, Außen- und Kriegsminister…
²  [Lord] Eldon: John Scott, first Earl of Eldon (1751-1838), britischer Politiker, Lordkanzler …
³  [Lord] Sidmouth: Henry Addington, 1st Viscount of Sidmouth (1757–1844), britischer Politiker, Sprecher des House of Commons, Premierminister …

Zurück zum Seiteninhalt